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Tiger art by wildlife artist Naomi Jenkin.

Amur Tigers

A story of hope

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A new year and a new wildlife art drawing! Well, sort of new. I actually started drawing this one back in early December but it’s taken quite a while to form into something shareable! I’ve been planning this piece for months and so I’m quite excited that it is now well and truly underway.

The inspiration for this piece came about when I stumbled across a rare happy statistic in the conservation world that Amur tiger numbers are actually increasing. Amur tigers (aka Siberian Tigers) did in fact become almost extinct in the 1940s, when just 40 remained in the wild. Thankfully, due to extensive conservation efforts, and Russia’s ban on tiger hunting, Amur tiger numbers have slowly increased so that by 2020 as many as 540 were recorded. Three other subspecies of tiger have already been driven to extinction at the hands of humankind, making the comeback of the Amur Tiger all the more poignant.

It seems so rare nowadays to hear positive stories relating to the state of our natural world, and so I wanted to do a piece to celebrate that and show that there is some hope if we can pull together and work with nature rather than against it. Tiger numbers overall, across 6 different subspecies, are still desperately low, making tigers the most critically endangered of the big cat species. But through conservation and political co-operation, the Amur tiger story shows us that it is possible to help these majestic creatures to thrive again.  

 

See the drawing come to life

Below you can see some progress images of my Amur tiger drawing. The finished piece will feature two Amur tiger cubs, standing shoulder to shoulder in the deep snow of the taiga (their subarctic forest habitat), and looking up to the sky. There’s quite a lot in the piece that feels symbolic to me. The two cubs being the next generation of tigers, symbolising hope in their uncertain world. The way they lift their gaze to the sky leaves you wondering what they’re looking up at. Are they taking in the scale of the mountain they have to climb (literally and metaphorically)? Are they looking to the sky in hope? And then the penetrating cold and deep snow of their surroundings highlights how difficult their environment can be, and so also symbolises their daily struggle for survival in a hostile world.

Scroll through the images below to see the different stages of the piece coming together. 

Fine art prints are now available to buy - click the button below to view. 

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